Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Wednesday, 8 April 2015

More northerly water falls

Water is falling, and it's not just liquid precipitation!

A few weeks ago (March 8) I posted about some of my favourite waterfalls in southern and southwestern Ontario. I gave a bit of detail on how I go about photographing the various falls, and some of the danger to be aware of.

On this post I want to share some of the waterfalls a bit farther east and north.

This first one is High Falls, northeast of Peterborough. Several years ago I went in with others to see it. It was at least a kilometre from the road and I don't think I could get to it again since it wasn't along any particular access trail.
More than one waterfall is called High Falls. This is one also known as High Falls, in the Bracebridge area, another municipality which like Hamilton, has a lot of waterfalls in the vicinity. It has a large volume of water going over it most of the time. A small park and picnic area is nearby.
Also in the greater Bracebridge area is Wilson's Falls. It isn't as impressive from a distance, but a trail leads right to the falls itself.
A short distance north of Huntsville is one of the more accessible and impressive falls that one can get quite intimate with. I visit it several times a year in various seasons.
Brooks Falls in February
Brooks Falls in October
A short distance downstream from Brooks Falls proper
 If you go to Manitoulin Island and come from the north via Espanola, you actually drive over these next falls, which are not visible from the highway. You have to get off at the small community of Whitefish Falls to find it. Once you get onto Manitoulin, at the village of Kagawong, is the impressive plunge falls known as Bridal Veil Falls. You can walk right around it, and even swim in the plunge pool.
Whitefish Falls
Bridal Veil Falls
Just west of Espanola, at the village of Massey, is Chutes Provincial Park. The numerous waterfalls there are mostly not plunge type, but more likely to be the cascade type, as shown in the next two images. Cascade types are longer but do not usually have as much of a vertical drop.



A bit northeast of Sudbury is Onaping Falls, which drops about 150 feet in a series of drops. One of the Group Of Seven, A. Y. Jackson, used this site for the subject of a painting on canvas. The next image was taken from the A. Y. Jackson lookout.


East of North Bay, half way to Mattawa is the Eau Claire Gorge Conservation Area, which features the Eau Claire waterfall. It is difficult to photograph, since about the only vantage point is right at the top and much of the cascade goes too close and under the viewing point. Nonetheless it is impressive to see, especially with a large volume of water flowing.
In the North Bay area is a very impressive and accessible falls, known as Duchesnay Falls. It is visible from the Trans Canada Highway, but it much more appreciated from the trail system.
View from the highway
Spring flow at Duchesnay Falls
 This next one is actually one of my favourite parts of Duchesnay Falls, but it is most impressive when the larger falls has a large volume of water, which spills over to this smaller side falls.










3 comments:

  1. I have actually been meaning to visit High Falls here in the Peterborough area, but just haven't gotten around to it yet! That photo looks like it is definitely visit worthy!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have actually been meaning to visit High Falls here in the Peterborough area, but just haven't gotten around to it yet! That photo looks like it is definitely visit worthy!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Tianna......thanks for the comment. High Falls is definitely worth the effort. My visit was in October, so the water flow might be considerably greater if you visit in the spring.

    ReplyDelete